Emergency Services

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304.799.7400

Info@PMHWV.org

150 Duncan Road

Buckeye, West Virginia 24924

Category: News

PMH Spring Fling Only a Month Away

PMH Spring Fling Only a Month Away

Pocahontas Memorial Hospital’s 8 th Annual Spring Fling is quickly approaching and will be held Saturday, April 6th at the Marlinton Opera House. Tickets are available now and will NOT be sold at the door. Ticket prices are $40 for an individual or $75 for a couple.

The Spring Fling is a stand-alone event and is completely separate from the day to day operations of the hospital. All profits after expenses are paid for will be contributed directly to PMH’s campaign to renovate patient rooms at the hospital.

The Spring Fling is a fun opportunity to get dressed up, enjoy some delicious food and great music, spend time with old friends and make new ones. In addition, it’s a wonderful way to support PMH’s room renovations and help usher in a new era of healthcare. To buy a ticket, please call 304-799-7400 and speak with Cheryl Cain at ext. 1051 or Edwina Garber at ext. 1081.

PMH Now Providing Physical Therapy in Green Bank

Pocahontas Memorial Hospital is very proud to now offer Physical Therapy services in Green Bank on Tuesdays and Thursdays of each week. After months of planning and work, the first patient walked through the doors of the BFD VFD Green Bank Station to the new outlying home of PMH’s Physical Therapy team.

Two rooms have been outfitted for the team, with one serving as a Registration Office and the other a patient room with equipment. Green Bank resident Tom Melko, Physical Therapist, who worked for many years at PMH, will be returning to see patients in the new location, as well as Physical Therapist Bevin Saul, of Greenbrier County, and Director of Rehab/Physical Therapy Assistant Jason Riffe, of Marlinton.

PMH is extremely proud of its rapidly growing rehabilitation program. Rehabilitation services are available for anyone in need of treatment in the recovery of a surgery, injury (including sports injuries), illness, or other medical condition such as acute or chronic pain, vertigo, frequent loss of balance or falls, difficulty rising from a low seat, and/or difficulty with mobility in general. Physical therapy services have long been the hallmark of the hospital’s rehabilitation services, but occupational and speech therapies are also available, at PMH.

Services are available both on an inpatient and outpatient level. If your health care provider recommends that you seek one of these types of therapies, you can schedule an appointment with PMH’s program just like any other therapy office. You may decide to schedule your physical therapy appointments either at the hospital or at the Green Bank location.

If you have any questions about the Rehabilitation services at PMH or would like information on scheduling an appointment, please contact the department at 304-799-1015.

PMH Now Providing Physical Therapy in Green Bank
RHC Offers Full Sunday Hours

RHC Offers Full Sunday Hours

 

Since June, the Rural Health Clinic at Pocahontas Memorial Hospital has been offering patients full Sunday hours. We are now open Sunday – Friday, 8:30am – 6:30pm. This makes it incrediblyconvenient for patients who may work out of town during the week, or just for minor medical concerns that may occur on the weekend. The Rural Health Clinic is a family medical practice, offering care for patients of all ages and conditions.

The Rural Health Clinic asks that you call ahead to make an appointment. Limited same day appointments are available. If you do not have a regular Primary Care Provider (or PCP), Pocahontas Memorial Hospital’s Rural Health Clinic (RHC) is accepting new patients and encourages you to schedule an appointment today with one of its providers. A Primary Care Provider is a health care practitioner who sees people that have common medical problems, such as a doctor, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant. Scheduling our children well child checks are a routine part of life, but teens and adults often neglect seeing a provider until they are sick. However, even healthy active people with no health conditions need to routinely see a health care provider.

The RHC encourages people of ALL ages to establish a relationship with a primary care provider. We often feel we are “wasting” a provider’s time by scheduling an appointment when we are not sick, but that is simply not true. Whether you suffer from something as simple as a cold or just have general questions about health issues, PCPs want to see you.

Having a PCP ensures that someone is regularly watching your health and looking for patterns that might indicate problems. Simple routine testing during a regular visit can uncover potential problems that might go unnoticed for years, leading to more serious issues later on.

For people with chronic diseases, the importance of having a PCP cannot be stressed enough. Patients who have a PCP experience better management of their chronic diseases, lower overall health care costs, and a higher level of satisfaction with their care. PCPs help coordinate a patient’s care all in one place – if you need further testing or an appointment with a specialist, the PCP will schedule that.

The RHC’s goal is to be your partner in health care and is committed to making available a personal provider who takes care of all your health care needs. This includes coordinating your care across all settings – the medical office, hospital, specialty clinics, testing facilities, or other places you would receive health care.

Please call the clinic today at 304-799-6200 to get started!

When Should I go to the Emergency Department?

 

Sometimes it’s hard to know whether you should go to the Emergency Department or your Primary Care Provider. Many trips to the Emergency Department end up being unnecessary and could easily have been handled by a primary care provider. Knowing the difference between primary care and emergency care will help you know where to go when the unexpected happens.

There are also huge differences in medical charges for primary care and emergency care. A trip to the Emergency Department is going to be a lot more expensive than a trip to your primary care provider. One reason is in the name – “emergency.” Emergency care requires a fully staffed department with topline medical equipment to treat true emergencies like stroke and trauma patients. The very nature of emergency care means a higher bill will reach your mailbox.

Primary care providers, like the Rural Health Clinic, should be your first contact in getting health care for you and your family. Your PCP knows your history and can typically coordinate your in-depth health care services with specialists if or when you need one. PCPs often leave time in their schedule for sick visits and may be able to see you the same day for minor illnesses or injuries. In addition to routine physical exams, vaccinations, and health screenings, go to your primary care provider for:

  • Allergic reaction
  • Colds, cough, fever, flu
  • Cuts with contained bleeding
  • Dehydration
  • Dizziness
  • Ear infection
  • Minor burns
  • Minor cuts/lacerations
  • Nausea
  • Rash
  • Sore throat
  • Sprain or strain
  • Urinary tract infection

Emergency care is for serious medical conditions that threaten a person’s life or limb. Urgent care is not emergency care – Know the difference. In case of an emergency, or if you are unsure if you can drive to the nearest emergency room, you should call 9-1-1. Examples of conditions to go to the Emergency Department for include:

  • Bone breaks
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Fainting/unconsciousness
  • Ingestion of objects or poisons
  • Major/significant trauma or injury
  • Seizures
  • Severe burns
  • Severe chest pain/heart palpitations
  • Snake or animal bites
  • Uncontrollable bleeding/vomiting blood

A trip to PMH’s Emergency Department will reveal a professional, caring staff whose goal is to get you treated and on your way again as soon as possible. The Emergency Department is fully staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and was designated a Level IV Trauma Center in 2014.

When Should I go to the Emergency Department?
New CEO of Pocahontas Memorial Hospital Announced

New CEO of Pocahontas Memorial Hospital Announced

Pocahontas Memorial Hospital is pleased to announce that it has selected Mary Beth Barr, of Petersburg, West Virginia as its new Chief Executive Officer. Ms. Barr will replace current CEO Barbara Lay who will be retiring October 1, 2018.

Ms. Barr was selected from a nationwide search that began in April and included written, telephone, and on-site interviews. The top three candidates were interviewed in person at Pocahontas Memorial Hospital (PMH) by a Search Committee made up of board members, administrative leaders, and staff. Included in the final round of interviews were tours and introductions of all hospital departments, providing an opportunity for employees to provide feedback on their first impressions to the Committee.

By a unanimous vote, Ms. Barr was selected by the Board of Trustees at its June meeting to lead the hospital as its next Chief Executive Officer. Board Chair Janet Ghigo announced the decision to PMH staff saying, “The Board is pleased to find a new CEO with Mary Beth Barr’s experience and qualifications. We look forward to working with her to make sure PMH continues to be a quality facility of which all residents of Pocahontas County can be proud.”

Ms. Barr has spent her entire professional career working in West Virginia healthcare. Coming from a nursing background, she served as the Director of Nursing/Director of Patient Services at Grant Memorial Hospital for eight years. She then moved into the role of Chief Operating Officer and after two years she was selected to serve as the Chief Executive Officer, a position she held for seven years. Ms. Barr has also served on the Board and as Treasurer for the West Virginia Hospital Association (WVHA), the West Virginia Center for Nursing, and was the WVHA Delegate to the American Hospital Association Regional Policy Board. She has been very active in her community by participating in the Grant County Chamber of Commerce, Main Street United Methodist Church Administrative Council, and the Petersburg Interfaith Food Pantry. Ms. Barr has firsthand knowledge and understanding of the complexities of the healthcare system and how to position an organization to maximize the potential for improving patient care and operational growth. She has been acknowledged for her capacity to harness the enthusiasm and talents of others, identify core issues, and obtain the necessary resources available in order to achieve management objectives.

“I believe Mary Beth Barr will bring knowledge and experience to Pocahontas Memorial Hospital that will be a tremendous benefit for the hospital and the people we serve. She is well respected in the healthcare industry and she has been a leader resource for me during my own career,” says Barbara Lay.

“I am pleased, honored, and humbled to accept this opportunity and join the team/family at Pocahontas Memorial Hospital. A successful team beats with one heart and I am excited to assist in leading the organization through the complexity of providing quality healthcare. It was very evident to me that everyone connected to PMH shares a desire to be successful, while simultaneously displaying sincere kindness and passion in everything they do!” stated Ms. Barr when asked about her new role.

Tips for Overcoming Depression

Everyone can have periods of depression that can drain your energy, making it difficult to take the steps that will help you to feel better. Overcoming depression is not quick or easy, but it is not impossible. You cannot just will yourself to “Snap out of it,” but you do have more control than you realize, even if your depression is severe and stubbornly persistent. The key is to start small and build from there by making positive choices for yourself each day.

Taking the first step is always the hardest. But going for a walk or dancing to your favorite music, for example, is something you can do right now. And it can substantially boost your mood and energy for several hours, long enough to put a second recovery step into action, such as preparing a meal or arranging to meet an old friend.

Challenge your thinking by learning to accept reality. Reality is what we take to be TRUE. What we take to be TRUE is what we believe. What we believe is based upon our perceptions. What we perceive depends upon what we look for. What we look for depends upon what we think. What we think depends upon what we perceive; thus what we take to be the TRUTH.

The trouble is that all too often we cling to things we hold to be true that simply are not. If you will examine the statement above you will find it is circular in its reasoning. This is actually how the mind thinks things through a lot of the time. Our thoughts circle and circle until we come to what we believe to be TRUE. The trouble with this natural process is that it often produces false truth. Here are some exercises that will help:

Don’t Put Yourself Down. Avoid listening to the negative messages that hold you back. They seem to spring out of nowhere but in reality they come into our mind from listening to self-defeating voices. If the voices are from outside, avoid those people or ignore them. If the voices come from inside, you and you alone have control over your thoughts. Instead of having the attitude that “I’ll never make it;” have the positive attitude “I’ll try to succeed. If I do, that’s wonderful, if I don’t, I’ll gain something from trying.”

Ask For Help. Often someone with a different perspective can show us things we couldn’t see otherwise. Asking the opinion of others is very useful. You do not have to take their advice, but hearing the thoughts of others will clarify your own thoughts.

Do things that make you feel good. For example, follow a healthy lifestyle, learn how to better manage stress, set limits on what you’re able to do and schedule fun activities into your day. Eat healthy and don’t skip meals. Minimize sugar and refined carbs; eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Aim for eight hours of sleep. (Depression typically involves sleep problems, whether you’re sleeping too little or too much, your mood suffers.) Also, keep stress in check by finding ways to relieve the pressure and regain control. You might try relaxation techniques like yoga, deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation.

GET MOVING! When you are depressed, just getting out of bed can seem like a daunting task, let alone working out! But exercise is a powerful depression fighter. Exercise is one of the most important tools in your recovery arsenal. Research shows that regular exercise can be as effective as medication for relieving depression symptoms. It also helps prevent relapse once you are well. To get the most benefit, aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. This does not have to be all at once. A 10 minute walk can improve your mood for two hours. And don’t forget the importance of sunshine. Sunlight can help boost serotonin levels and improve your mood. Double up on the benefits of sunlight by exercising outside when you can. Just do not forget your sunscreen.

Sometimes, those suffering with depression may want or require counseling or treatment. Please call Pocahontas Memorial Hospital’s Rural Health Clinic today at 304-799-6200 to schedule an appointment for a confidential, personal visit with a licensed Clinical Social Worker.

Tips for Overcoming Depression
Prize Palooza Coming Up!

Prize Palooza Coming Up!

Join the PMH Auxiliary for a fun night to raise funds for our future walking trail!  Games, prizes, and refreshments are all part of our first ever Priza Palooza!  Entry fee is $25 for adults and $5 for children under 12.  Under 5 is free.

Delinda Woody Joins Rural Health Clinic

On Monday, September 18, the Rural Health Clinic at Pocahontas Memorial Hospital warmly welcomed Delinda Woody as the newest addition to their medical staff. Delinda is a Family Nurse Practitioner and received a Master’s of Science Degree from Western Carolina University.  She also has a post Master’s Certification as a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner from the University of North Carolina.

Delinda has a background in family practice, but most recently worked primarily with psychiatric patients. Prior to obtaining her degree as a Family Nurse Practitioner, Delinda was a Registered Nurse for the North Carolina Department of Corrections.

Delinda is excited about joining the RHC staff and returning to family practice. She has a particular interest in Chronic Disease management and likes helping both treat and educate patients.  She enjoys seeing the improvements of her patients and empowering them to improve their own health.  She has already begun seeing patients in the RHC and is looking forward to the different challenges and issues that total family care presents.

Delinda will be seeing patients of all ages. The RHC offers a full range of medical services including care for illness and chronic disease management, well child checks, immunizations, and physical examinations, in addition to women’s and children’s health services.

Delinda has personal ties to the area, but was particularly drawn to Pocahontas County because it is so similar to where she lived and grew up in the mountains of North Carolina. She is familiar with the rural farm setting with an economy that is largely dependent on tourism.  And while not a skier, she was within only a few miles of three ski resorts in North Carolina.

The PMH Rural Health Clinic is open to all and located inside the hospital, which allows patients access to lab and x-ray services without having to go through the emergency department. You may make an appointment with Delinda or one of our other providers by calling 304-799-6200.  Walk-ins are also welcome.  The clinic is open Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. as well as limited weekend hours. Registration for the clinic is at the front desk of the hospital.

Delinda Woody Joins Rural Health Clinic
PMH Celebrating “Swing Bed” Services

PMH Celebrating “Swing Bed” Services

Pocahontas Memorial Hospital has designated September as their “Swing Bed Month” and has been holding events and education throughout the month to raise awareness of this program. “Swing Bed,” or Skilled Nursing, is a great service available at PMH that many in the community have no knowledge of.

Throughout the month, hospital staff will be wearing badges saying “Ask me about Swing Bed at PMH!” to encourage patients and visitors to start a conversation. A popcorn giveaway and Swing Bed crossword contest were held last week for staff to build their own knowledge of the program. Building on the swing theme, all employees who completed the crossword had their name entered in a drawing for a hammock swing. Debbie Crookshanks was the lucky winner.

Other events included a special reception for Swing Bed patients who successfully met their goals while on the program and are now back home, presentations and talks for community groups, and an employee stretch break led by the Rehabilitation Team.

Swing Bed is a skilled nursing program that you can be admitted to after any qualifying illness or surgery to receive rehabilitation therapy or special medical treatments. PMH offers physical, occupational, speech, or respiratory therapies. Treatments could include wound care or IV antibiotics.

Patients may qualify if they have been in a hospital on acute care and require further skilled services. For example, a person may be hospitalized with congestive heart failure or pneumonia and need additional care because they are weak or debilitated. They could then transfer into the Swing Bed program. Or, maybe you have joint replacement or surgery done at a hospital away from here and need additional physical therapy and recovery. Rather than stay at that particular hospital, you can request to be transferred to PMH for the very same services. On average, a patient is enrolled in the program for one to two weeks. Swing Bed is covered by insurances and Medicare.

For further information about the Swing Bed program, please contact Edwina Garber at 304-799-7400 ext 1081.

Senior Luncheon an Opportunity for Fellowship and Education

Pocahontas Memorial Hospital’s monthly series of Senior Luncheons will continue on Wednesday, August 30th with guest speaker Heather Sharp-Spinks, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker.  Senior Luncheons are one of PMH’s most popular outreach programs.  Attendees and staff alike look forward to visiting and catching up on each other’s lives.

Occurring each month from March until November, the Senior Luncheon is a fun hour of fellowship, education, door prizes, and of course, a tasty lunch. After enjoying lunch, a speaker presents to the group on a topic of interest.  Requests are taken from attendees and speakers come from both inside and outside the hospital and medical community.  Past topics have included heart health, generic vs. name brand medications, and the importance of immunizations.

Pocahontas Memorial Hospital is committed to helping Pocahontas County residents take charge of their own health and is constantly working to increase outreach efforts in the community. We want to be a place that people can come to not just to seek medical care, but for educational resources.

Please make plans to join us on August 30th.  The luncheon is free, but if you would like to attend you must RSVP to Edwina Garber at 304-799-7400 ext. 1081 by August 28th.

Senior Luncheon an Opportunity for Fellowship and Education